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Carotid artery disease


Reducing stroke risk


Carotid artery disease
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Your doctor has listened to the side of your neck with a stethoscope in the past. You never knew why, but now you do. Your doctor reports hearing a whooshing noise — something called a bruit (bru-ee) — that raises concern that the main (carotid) artery supplying blood to your brain may be clogging up. This can increase your risk of a stroke, which occurs when the blood supply to part of your brain is interrupted or severely reduced, depriving brain tissue of oxygen and nutrients.

Clogging of one or both carotid arteries (carotid artery stenosis) is the cause of about 8 to 15 percent of the most common type of stroke, called an ischemic stroke.



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